Cloud Computing
Cloud Computing

Cloud services have become increasingly popular in the business world in recent years. The basis of cloud computing is that data is not stored on a person’s physical machine but hosted in third party pools known as the cloud. This allows for businesses to store more information without having to worry about failure of their own computers and risk losing vital information. This type of storage has already been adopted by Amazon, Google, and Microsoft. It is estimated that 74 percent of enterprises now use cloud computing. There has been a 19% increase in usage of the service since 2009 (Lynn, 2011).

These services also allow virtual collaboration on projects that can also be worked on simultaneously, making meetings and traditional office work obsolete. One of the key benefits to cloud storage is the ability to recover from a disaster, since the data is stored in a third party location any problems can easily be mitigated. However, there have been concerns about the security of data that is stored in the cloud and whether this information could be sabotaged easily. Cloud storage is also used by individuals who enjoy the convenience of having their data readily accessible from any machine. The cloud service market is projected to reach $131 billion in 2013 compared to $111 billion in 2012 The highest growth rate regions are Asia and Latin America (Presti, 2013).

 

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